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Archive for Making Tax Digital

How does tax work in UK

How Income Tax, National Insurance and the Personal Allowance works

Unsure about Income Tax and National Insurance? Don’t know what the National Insurance threshold is? Unsure how the Personal Allowance applies to you? We explain how the tax system works and what to do if you think you’re overpaying.

  • Should I pay any Income Tax?
  • The Personal Allowance if you earn over £100,000
  • What is Income Tax used for?
  • How much Income Tax will I pay?
  • National Insurance
  • What do you pay National Insurance on?
  • Voluntary ‘Class 3’ National Insurance rates
  • Voluntary ‘Class 2’ National Insurance rates

Should I pay any Income Tax?

Income Tax is charged on most types of income, such as wages and salary from jobs, your profits if you run a business, pensions, rents you receive if you’re a landlord, and interest and dividends from savings and investments.?

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You don’t usually pay Income Tax on all of your taxable income. This is because most people qualify for one or more allowances. An allowance is an amount of otherwise taxable income that you can have tax-free each tax year.


Reduced by £1 for every £2 above income threshold until it reaches £0.

20% of this allowance is given as a reduction in your tax bill (unlike the Personal Allowance and Age Allowance which are deducted from your taxable income before tax is worked out).

£1,000 for basic-rate taxpayers; £500 for higher-rate taxpayers; £0 for additional-rate taxpayers.

Most allowances are increased each year and increases apply from the start of the tax year, 6 April.

Jump down to ‘How much Income Tax will I pay?’ to find out what you’re liable for.

What is a Personal Allowance?

Everyone, including students, has something called a Personal Allowance – the amount of money you’re allowed to earn each tax year before you pay Income Tax. Your Personal Allowance may be bigger if you claim Marriage Allowance or Blind Person’s Allowance, or smaller depending on your income or if you owe tax from a previous tax year.

The tax year runs from 6 April to 5 April, and for the 2019-20 tax year the standard Personal Allowance is £12,500. The Personal Allowance will also be set at £12,500 for 2020/21 tax year and then indexed with the Consumer Price Index (CPI) from then onwards.

If you earn less than this, you normally shouldn’t have to pay any Income Tax.

The amount of the Personal Allowance you receive is set by the government and can change from one tax year to the next.Check the most up-to-date Personal Allowance figures on GOV.UK.

The Personal Allowance if you earn over £100,000

For people earning over £100,000, the figure of £12,500 will be reduced by £1 for every £2 earnt. When someone earns £125,000 Income Tax is paid on everything earnt and there’s no tax-free allowance.

What is Income Tax used for?

Your Personal Allowance is taken off your earnings before you start paying Income Tax.

Income Tax is collected by HMRC on behalf of the government. It’s used to help provide funding for public services such as the NHS, education and the welfare system, as well as investment in public projects, such as roads, rail and housing.

How much Income Tax will I pay?

From April 2019, the standard Personal Allowance will increase to £12,500, with the higher rate tax threshold increasing to £50,000.

Income Tax is made up of different bands. This means that as your income increases so too does the amount of Income Tax you pay.

It’s an attempt to make paying Income Tax as fair as possible so that those who earn the most contribute more.

The table below shows the rates of Income Tax depending on how much you earn.

If you live in Wales, income tax rates are now set by the Welsh Government. These are currently the same as for England and Northern Ireland in the 2019/20 tax year. If you live in Scotland, the rates are different.

Calculate your income tax and national insurance contributions.

If you think you might have had Income Tax wrongly taken from your earnings, fill in the form from Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs (HMRC) to have it paid back to you.Get the R38 form to reclaim tax on GOV.UK, or contact HMRC.

National Insurance

National Insurance contributions are a tax on earnings paid by employees and employers and help to build your entitlement to certain state benefits, such as the State Pension and Maternity Allowance.

Unlike Income Tax, National Insurance is not an annual tax. It applies to your pay each pay period (which might be monthly, weekly or some other period depending on your employer’s arrangements). This means if you earn extra in one month, you’ll pay extra National Insurance, but you won’t be able to claim the extra back even if your pay is lower during the other months of the tax year.

You begin paying National Insurance once you earn more than £166 a week (this is the figure for the 2019-20 tax year).

The National Insurance rate you pay depends on how much you earn:

  • 12% of your weekly earnings between £166 and £962
  • 2% of your weekly earnings above £962.

Your National Insurance contributions will be taken off along with Income Tax before your employer pays your wages.

Until April 1977, some older married women and widows who pay National Insurance contributions at the Married Women’s Reduced Rate could choose to pay a reduced rate of national insurance. You might still be paying the reduced rate if you opted for this before the scheme ended. The reduced rate is 5.85% of weekly earnings between £166 and £962 instead of the standard rate of National Insurance of 12% on earnings. As a result, your State Pension could be reduced and your ability to claim some contribution-based benefits could be negatively impacted.

Employee’s National Insurance contributions stop once you reach State Pension age.Find out more about your National Insurance contributions on GOV.UKopens in new window.

What do you pay National Insurance on?

Both you and your employer must pay National Insurance contributions on your earnings – including holiday pay, sick pay and maternity pay – and, in most cases, any reward you get that can be easily converted to cash. But there are exceptions – for example, if part of your pay is shares in your employer’s company using a tax-approved share scheme.

Part of your pay may be in the form of benefits in kind. As an employee, there is no National Insurance on benefits in kind. However, with some exceptions, employers do have to pay National Insurance on the value of any benefits in kind that they provide you with.

What do National Insurance payments pay for?

Your National Insurance payments go towards state benefits and services, including:

  • the NHS
  • the State Pension
  • unemployment benefits
  • sickness and disability allowances.

Voluntary ‘Class 3’ National Insurance rates

Class 3 voluntary National Insurance contributions are designed to fill in any gaps in your National Insurance record to get a higher State Pension.

To receive the full new State Pension, which is payable to people who have reached their State Pension age on or after 6 April 2016, you’ll need to have 35 qualifying years of National Insurance contributions.

Anyone with less than this will receive a reduced State Pension. To receive the new State Pension you need to have a minimum of 10 qualifying years.

If you don’t have 35 qualifying years, you may want to consider paying Class 3 voluntary contributions to boost your pension entitlement.

In 2019-20, Class 3 contributions are payable at a weekly rate of £15. This is the maximum you can pay each week.

You may not always be able to pay Class 3 contributions (or Class 2) for a tax-year. That’s why it’s important to find out whether you can make payments towards any gaps, how much you will need to pay, and what benefit (if any) you would get by making a voluntary payment before deciding whether to pay any voluntary National Insurance Contributions (NICs).For further information on paying voluntary Class 3 National Insurance contributions and to check your national insurance record visit the GOV.uk website.

Voluntary ‘Class 2’ National Insurance rates

If you’re self-employed or have been working abroad, you may be able to pay voluntary Class 2 contributions instead.

Class 2 NICs are currently flat-rate weekly contributions of £3.00 per week in 2019-20. You’ll need to pay them for every week or partial week of self-employment in a tax year if your profits for the entire tax year are £8,632 (the Small Profits Threshold) or more in 2019-20.

Payment of Class 2 contributions is voluntary for self-employed people with profits below the Small Profits Threshold. Paying Class 2 NICs even if your profits are lower can still help you build contributory entitlements to benefits.

This can be a specialist area and it’s best to take advice based on your individual personal circumstances.

Making Tax Digital for VAT – can I just record the daily gross takings?

Making Tax Digital for VAT – can I just record the daily gross takings?

For many businesses, Making Tax Digital changes how transactions must be recorded in their accounting records. Not only does it require the relevant information to be captured digitally, the rules specify precisely what information needs to be recorded in relation to each supply. This may require a change in the method or nature (or both) of these businesses’ record-keeping.


At Cloud Accounting LLP, we have seen numerous queries around how to keep records which are compliant with MTD, but a question which comes up repeatedly is how MTD affects businesses who supply final consumers, but who do not consider themselves ‘retailers’. Examples could include restaurants and cafes, car wash businesses, and even a different revenue stream within a non-retail business such as a bar or a gift shop within a B&B or hotel. I will refer to them as ‘cash businesses’ in the remainder of this article.

Summary

Retailers and other cash businesses (those who sell to an end consumer) do not need to capture the details of each individual supply they make in their digital records, but they do need to record the total of all retail supplies for each day of trading – it cannot be done on a less frequent (eg weekly) basis.

This can be done on a simple Monday – Friday spreadsheet. In certain circumstances it may be necessary to split gross takings between those supplies that are zero rated and standard rated.

Read on if you want to understand the detailed legislation behind it:


Record keeping requirements

Let’s first look at the basic requirements and consider why cash businesses may find these difficult to comply with.
The Value Added Tax (Amendment) Regulations (2018 No. 261) state that the following information must be captured within the digital records:
(3) Subject to paragraph (4) the information specified for the purposes of paragraph (1) for each accounting period is—
(a) subject to sub-paragraph (c), for each supply made within the period—
(i) the time of supply,
(ii) the value of the supply, and
(a) subject to sub-paragraph (c), for each supply made within the period—
(i) the time of supply,
(ii) the value of the supply, and
(iii) the rate of VAT charged;
Paragraph (c) provides some relaxation from these rules:
(c) where more than one supply is recorded on a tax invoice and those supplies are either—
(i) supplies made which are required to be accounted for in respect of the same prescribed accounting period and are subject to the same rate of VAT, or they may be treated as a single supply for the purposes of … sub-paragraph (a)…
These rules are repeated in paragraph 4.3.2 of the VAT Notice (700/22).


Most readers will be aware that the word ‘supply’ in VAT has a particular meaning, and is much more granular than the amounts recorded on an invoice or statement, or amounts paid or received. So, businesses who make lots of individual supplies, particularly to end customers for whom they are not required to supply a VAT invoice, would have difficulties complying with the above record-keeping requirements of MTD.


Relaxation for retailers

Fortunately, all is not lost. Provision has been made in the Regulations to relax the above requirements in particular circumstances:
(4) The information specified in paragraph (3) may be varied by direction of the Commissioners to make provision about—

(c) the operation of retail schemes under Part 9 of these Regulations (supplies by
retailers);
Paragraph 4.5 of the VAT Notice provides that relaxation in a paragraph which has the force of law:
In addition to the records listed in paragraph 4.3 above, if you account for VAT using a retail scheme you must keep a digital record of your Daily Gross Takings (DGT). You are not required to keep a separate record of the supplies that make up your DGT within functional compatible software.
For more information on retail schemes and Daily Gross Takings see VAT notice 727: retail schemes.


So, retailers do not need to capture the details of each individual supply they make in their digital records, but they do need to record the total of all retail supplies for each day of trading – it cannot be done on a less frequent (eg weekly) basis.
But the question remains – does this relaxation include ‘non-traditional’ retailers ie the cash businesses described above?


What is a retailer?

There is no definition of ‘retail’ or ‘retailer’ in the VAT Act or the VAT Regulations. HMRC provide a definition in the retail scheme VAT Notice (727) as follows:
Retail is the selling of goods or services to consumers [and the retail schemes are aimed at retailers that cannot account for VAT using normal accounting].


Accounting for VAT in the normal way does not require businesses to issue a tax invoice to unregistered customers, but it does require them to identify, for each sale, the tax exclusive value and the VAT, and to be able to produce periodic totals of those amounts. Many cash businesses will not be able to do this, because of the level of information they retain in relation to each sale they make – even if they use electronic tills.


Therefore, in accordance with the definition above, and as HMRC has also kindly confirmed to us, cash businesses are considered to be retailers for these purposes. Cash businesses are likely to be covered by the point of sale scheme. This applies where the business is identifying the VAT rate when they make the sale and, if all sales are standard rated, they simply apply the VAT fraction to calculate the VAT due. As there is no retail scheme calculation per se to undertake then these businesses often do not realise that they are using a retail scheme.


So, these cash businesses can therefore benefit from the relaxation set out above in relation to their retail sales ie they can simply record their Daily Gross Takings in their digital records. They do not need to record each individual sale, nor is a digital link required between their tills and their accounting records – the input of the Daily Gross Takings is the start of the digital journey.


Any non-retail sales will need to be recorded in the digital records on a supply-by-supply basis as they do not benefit from this relaxation.

MTD considerations

MTD considerations

  Making Tax Digital for VAT – Main issues for consideration Read extract or Click on Logo below to watch video: Changes to record keeping – Businesses in scope will no longer be able to keep manual records. Digital records must be maintained in what is defined as ‘functional compatible software’ which can connect to HMRC […]

Making Tax Digital – Facts

Making Tax Digital – Facts

Survival guide (for the self employed) Many self employed taxpayers and property landlords are unaware of HM Revenue and Custom’s radical plans to transform the tax online filing system. The Facts The way that you report your business profits to HMRC is changing. From April 2017 the cash reporting rules change for the self employed […]

Making Tax Digital Penalties

Making Tax Digital Penalties

Read extract or Click on Logo below to watch video: HMRC’s Making Tax Digital (MTD) proposals apply from April 2019 for VAT: from 2020 the self employed and landlords will be required to submit five tax returns per year. This brings about new challenges in terms of the design of penalties for late filing and […]

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